Time doesn’t exist until we invent it

The transcontinental railroads led to the invention of time zones. For the first time, everyone needed to be in sync, regardless of what village one lived in.

A few generations later, we’re in all in sync, to the second, thanks to the computers in our pockets.

Time is borrowed, wasted, spent. We find the time, slow down time, take our time. Its Miller, quitting, clobberin time. We focus on the stitch in time, hard time, closing time, not to mention big, daylight savings, race against, first, last, due, nick of…

Time is so variable, so based on our experience, that the absolute measure of time is almost meaningless. Don’t even get me started about relativity and time travel.

Time on a long bus trip goes so much slower than time spent doing what we love with people we care about. We’ll pay $1000 to buy an hour in some circumstances, but refuse to pay a $5 premium to save an hour in others.

Time doesn’t exist, not in a way that matters to most people. The story we tell ourselves about time, though, is the overriding narrative of our day to day lives.

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“The aim of life is to live, and to live means to be aware,

 joyously, drunkenly, serenely, divinely aware.”

Henry Miller (1891-1980) US novelist

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When I am completely aware and living in the NOW, it is easier for me to accept the things as they really are and not as I want them to be.

It’s when I’m preoccupied with the potential problems of the future that I lose most of my awareness.

This is why it is so important for us to put things in perspective, especially a long-term perspective.

If I ask myself questions like the following ones;

What will I think of this particular problem in 1, 5 or 10 years?

How will I feel about this minor aggravation a week from now?

Why am I so annoyed with this person?

How can I keep my calm when I’m stuck in a traffic jam?

Who cares if this stranger is insulting me?

 you can continue with your own questions here.

When we think of it, it is often these petty annoyances that disturb us the most.

After we take the time to answer our own personal questions with a long term perspective in mind, we can start to live in the NOW again, and this will improve our quality of life.

Awaress is in the NOW .

 

Why does it take so much time to so many of us to understand this simple reality?

Or if we understand it, why is it so difficult to practice in our own lives?

 

“The future will depend on what we do in the present”

Mahatma Gandhi

(1869-1948)

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We all know this, it is so simple to understand when we read it. However, the challenge is not only to read it and understand it, the real challenge is to practice what we understand so well.

Yes, practice it day in day out, especially when you have distractions, a bad day or a good day.

Whatever is your dream, your project, your goal, pursue it relentlessly without wasting time.

You need a burning desire to keep yourself absorbed and focused, even when you have so many responsibilities and distractions.

“Any idiot can face a crisis – it’s day to day living that wears you out.”

Anton Chekhov

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There is a lot of truth in this quote!

Sometimes, we are at our personal best when we are in the middle of a crisis.

Somehow, we find the energy and the courage to fight when everything seems to be hopeless.

On the other hand, the routine of the day to day can sometimes drain more energy from us than a big crisis.

Why would this be?

It seems to me that our focus is better and that we are less distracted when we feel threatened than when times are easy.

 

 

 

I don’t want a personal history.

Why?

Because I can renew myself daily?

It’s not about who you were. It’s not about who you are.

It’s all about who you are becoming that is important.

Do you want a personal history?

Do you ever ask yourself: What am I becoming?

To follow your dream, you don’t need the greatest amount of knowledge about anything, but it does call for the persistent use of whatever knowledge you may have.

Knowledge without action is not as valuable as applied knowledge.

Richard Branson calls this “Learning by doing”

Donald Trump advice is “Always question”

Reg Revans used to say: “The best knowledge happens in real life with real problems and real people. It doesn’t happen in the classroom with Know-it-all-teachers.

So what is your dream?

What is your major purpose in life?

How are you using your time?

How much of it are you wasting, and how are you wasting it?

What are you going to do about your dream?